THE 'DINOSAUR KILLER' AND OTHER METEORITES

Martin Schøyen makes a second donation to Oslo Cathedral School

 

In a second donation to his alma mater, the Olso Cathedral School, Martin Schøyen has given, for safekeeping and display, his collection of thirty meteorites.

They include pieces from the moon, from Mars, from the major asteroids Vesta, Eros and Ceres, from comets and from more distant star systems. Some of the meteorites present extra-planetary evidence of water, amino acids and other building blocks of life. One sample (the 'dinosaur killer' meteorite) is part of the K-T boundary evidence that led to our current understanding of the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous era. While the meteorites themselves come from all around the world, the majority in the collection were acquired from other collectors.

"The Schøyen Collection is known widely for historical manususcripts, but my personal interests go further," explained Martin Schøyen. "Acquring these meteorites as collections as well as  directly through my own efforts has given me great satisfaction. I hope that seeing them in a learning environment will help inspire pupils at the Cathedral School to increase our knowledge about the universe and our place in it."

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 Note to Editors:

The Schøyen Collection crosses borders and unites cultures, religions and unique materials found nowhere else. The Collection, based in London and Oslo, contains over 20,000 significant manuscripts of major cultural importance and is an important part of the world’s heritage.

There is no public collection that has the Schøyen Collection’s unique array of manuscripts from all the greatest manuscript hoards, including the Dead Sea Scrolls, The Cairo Genizah of Hebrew MSS, The Oxyrhynchus hoard of classical papyri, The Dishna Biblical papyri, The Nag Hammadi Gnostic papyri, the Dunhuang hoard of Buddhist MSS, and many others. Nor is there one with such a variety, geographically, linguistically and textually, and of scripts and writing materials, covering so a great span of time — 5,000 years of history.