THE FEKULA PROLOGUE

MS 1754
MS Short Title THE FEKULA PROLOGUE
Text PROLOGUE, SYNAXARION: SHORT ACCOUNTS OF THE FEASTS OF THE CHURCH YEAR, LIVES OF THE SAINTS, AND EXTRACTS FROM THE WRITINGS OF THE HOLY FATHERS, FOR THE PERIOD 20 APRIL TO 15 AUGUST
Description MS in Russian Church Slavonic on paper, Russia, 4th quarter of 16th c., 349 ff. (-ca. 5), 28x19 cm, single column, (20x12 cm), 26 lines in Cyrillic half-uncial, headings and initials in red, 3 illuminated headpieces of geometric and stylised floral patterns in blue and red on highly burnished gold grounds, a full-page illuminated miniature comprising 4 rows of 44 selected saints, including Christ, Mother of God and the 12 apostles, in full colours highlighted with gold, enclosed by a border in floral design of red and burnished gold, in the style of icons standardised by Metropolitan Macarius in the Kremlin in the mid-16th c., and an early example of the Stroganov school.
Binding Russia, 18th c., blindstamped calf gilt over wooden boards of Western European design, sewn on 4 cords, with viaz' script on upper cover and spine.
Context The second saint in the first row of the miniature, is Dionysius Glushitskii, the Wonderworker, who was the owner of the Triodion, MS 1751.
Provenance 1. Russian collection, N.44 (18th c.); 2. The Paul M. Fekula Collection, New York, MS 783 and F-XVIII (until 1990); 3. Sotheby's 29.11.1990:66; 4. Sam Fogg Rare Books Ltd, London.
Commentary Because of the outstanding miniature, the present MS was considered the most important MS in The Fekula Collection, together with the Triodion, MS 1751.
Published Mateja Matejic: Slavic Manuscripts from the Fekula Collection: A Description. Columbus, Ohio 1983.
Exhibited "Preservation for access: Originals and copies". On the occasion of the 1st International Memory of the World Conference, organized by the Norwegian Commission for UNESCO and the National Library of Norway, at the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, 3 June - 14 July 1996.
Mentioned Keenan et al., eds.: The Paul M. Fekula Collection. A Catalogue. New York 1988.
Boxing
Colophon
See also
Place of origin Russia
Dates 4th quarter 16c AD

Location